The Resilience of A Samoan Woman

Nine months pregnant with her third child, she knew it was time to deliver.  She left her two children, ages three and two, home alone, and walked to the hospital to deliver her third child.  The hospital was less than a quarter of a mile walk for her, she prayed that her babies left home unattended would be safe until their father’s return from his meeting, she locked the doors and walked on, nine months pregnant, and prepared for her third child’s arrival into this world.

What she knew about herself was this: I am the granddaughter of a High Matai, I am the daughter of a mother who’s voice will be heard by all in the village, I am the daughter of a father who’s formidable presence in the village is known by all, I am my parents’ first-born of their nine children, I am well known for being the one woman in our village to climb our coconut trees (with great speed), I am the keeper of my family’s lineage,… I am–therefore–I will!

Soon after giving birth to her third child, her second son, she walked home with her baby in her arms and her husband at her side…  I am–therefore–I will!

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9 thoughts on “The Resilience of A Samoan Woman

  1. Short, to the point and POWERFUL! Thanks for sharing this piece of your mother’s early years. Much love and respect to all Mothers.

  2. *snort* at nikita..

    if you only speak when spoken to, how will you ever break the silence?
    i swear i hate that sayin..
    but then im just bein too literal huh..

    and what makes being a grand-daughter of a High matai so hard to believe? i happen to be a great-grand daughter of one. though i cant say i can climb coconut trees (lol). i can say that we, do not have servants to whom we give chores we are capable of doing ourselves, and never had a nanny at that.

    i daresay you cannot be a true Samoan if you think western royalties are anythin like Samoan ones ( im referin to where you so intelligently say that if she really were royalty she would have servants)
    one could almost call you arrogant if not ignorant.

    cheers to talaaga. and forgive me if my honesty proves too offensive.
    =].

  3. For Nikita:

    This story is a true story about a moment in my mother (and father) and their early years as first-generation Samoans in the USA; during the time of rotary phones and pay phones. Leaving two children home alone…well, my mother did what she needed to do, and her faith unshakeable in our Heavenly Father, she walked on--I don’t know anything about royalties or nannies.

    The babies were fine, our father returned home soon enough to find them fast asleep and no mother, but he figured she must be at the hospital, and there she was giving birth to her third child.

    Thank you for making the time to read and respond to my stories.

  4. LOL@this story

    If there was any truth that she was:

    “I am the granddaughter of a High Matai, I am the daughter of a mother who’s voice will be heard by all in the village, I am the daughter of a father who’s formidable presence in the village is known by all, I am my parents’ first-born of their nine children, I am well known for being the one woman in our village to climb our coconut trees (with great speed), I am the keeper of my family’s lineage,… I am–therefore–I will!”

    Then, she should would have servants like and a nanny who took care of us.

    The statement of leaving her two (2) children at home and fitting into such royalty does not sit well with me. Only speak when you’re spoken too.

  5. I am humbled by your welcome, “Thank You.” Your cuzin symbolizes exactly what I mean to communicate: “The Resilience of A Samoan Woman.”

    Quite frankly there are other historical events world wide that make women the symbol of “beasts of burden,” however, for immediate reference, your cuzin and my mother are one of many of our Samoan women whom capture the fortitude of our people (Mau Rebellion). I acknowledge that our women (world wide) are the ones whom are the essence of our family, our women are the hearth of our home, our women are the doorway to our existence.

    This piece is designed to share with our readers a fraction (microscopic) of my mother’s life, but more than that, I wanted to to acknowledge the difference between my mother and the ‘other’ women (sister, girlfriend, the like) in my life. The ‘difference’ may have nothing to do with my mother being Samoan, or it may have everything to do with her being Samoan!

    However, what I’ve observed is this, that she frequently calls upon our God and our ancestors for strength, and I cannot help but realize there’s a genetic, fibrous part of who they are that sets them apart from other women in the world--“The Resilience of A Samoan Woman!!”

  6. Welcome to world of SAMOAN WOMAN,,,MA CUZIN’S WIFE PLAYED VOLLEYBALL AT THE FUA GAME ONE DAY AND GAVE BIRTH THE NEXT DAY.

    THE FOLLOWING DAY SHE WENT BACK TO WORK.

  7. She is a “….Dayummmmm that’s some kinda woman….dayummmmm!” That woman, this woman is my mother, and I love her dearly, although, honestly, it’s hard to remember when she goes on and on and on--LOL, just jokes, uso! And that third-born, her second son, well, you’ve read the rest!

    Fa’afetai tele lava mo le alofa! Ia manuia!

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