Laying the smack down

As devout Christians, many Samoans agreed with the religious right. No law was going to stop a parent from disciplining their child. As comedian Russell Peters puts it, “my father would say: If I get rid of one, I’ll just make another one… and I’ll tell the new one what an idiot the last one was!”

We all remember getting a good ol fashioned beating. And many of us would agree that at the time it hurt like hell, and there were times where we wanted to and probably tried to run away from the inevitable. But I’m sure we would also all agree that it was necessary, it was part of growing up and learning lessons. We probably feel we are better people because of those hidings. And in many ways, we would exact some sort of version of those same disciplinary actions on our own kids.

…from NiuZila

…::my unburnt bridge::…

Do you know what its like to lose a child? The stabbing pain to be parted with your unborn baby?? The love of a mother so excited to await her child’s arrival only to never get that day?? I have…What do you do when your so eager to start your new family & your busy with the finer side of life only to go to the bathroom & see a pool of blood surround you? How do you think it feels for a mother to know that her child has decided to give up on their journey & leave you?? That look that the doctor gives you when they look at you with those really intense eyes & you know the next thing out of their mouths will obviously not be along the lines of Congratulations, or Its a minor glitch, you know that they themselves are trying to find the most tactful way to relay the news…

…by High Matai

Saying sorry to your child

As a child I was taught that when you do something wrong you need to say sorry. But when I think about it now, I hardly ever heard my parents or any other Samoan parents say sorry to their children. Especially when it was the parents that seemed to be in the wrong. How many times have you been yelled at for something you didn’t do just to never hear your parents say sorry? How many of you grew up with alcoholic fathers just to never hear them say sorry for waking you up at 3am to make them something to eat after they have had a long night in the pub? How many times did you have to go without lunch because your parents were too busy trying to look good in front of the congregation and give your shopping money for lafoga? Did they ever say sorry?

…with Love, from Sia